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20121101
20121130
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Book TV 24
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CSPAN2 24
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English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 3:30pm EST
in manhattan in 1967. i say that rarely in the boston public library, but i was. these are two images from my youth. we have similar images of new york and boston in the 1970s as well. the bottom image is gerald ford denying new york for a successful bailout. indeed, new york was very much headed for the trash heap of history. the city had been hemorrhaging by the thousands. it was not automobile production in detroit, it was production in new york city. and that was decimated by globalization and new technology. the city had been caught in a spiral of disorder and rising crime rate. racial conflicts just like here in boston, and the fiscal situation had gotten out of control with budgets that were far too high for the city to afford. it looked as if new york was going to go back to the weeds. like this image of jimmy carter wandering through the wasteland, and it really seemed as if the planet of the apes image of the statue of liberty rising was possible. with the cities were things that as time had come and gone, the future of the city's seemed dim because their original reason has largely
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 8:15am EST
you so much. [applause] >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel entitled the triumph of the city, featuring edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wb, ur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? this. [laughter] i thought he was taller, i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair, and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a atlantic event? -- a terrific event? [applause] let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city, so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we'
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 2:30pm EST
the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel entitled, what's next for women featuring anita hill, and arose in, and madeline kahn in. this is about an hour. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. such a pleasure to see you all year at what is absolutely one of my favorite advance in the city every year, the boss and books festival. i am co-host of radio boston. [applause] >> thank you very much. if you don't listen to this show i'm going to give a shameless plug. 3:00 p.m. monday through friday and, of course, very proud to be a presenting partner for boston but festival because this spirit that brings literally tens of thousands of us together on a day like this inquiry investigation exploration, love of learning and literature, it is a natural combination for the city of boston, boston but festival, and w. b. you are. i'm honored and proud to be here, especially for this panel. and before i introduce the three amazing women who are sitting to my right, a couple of quick reminders. one is that cell phones, if you have already been given that reminder, please turn them off. at the
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 4:45pm EST
for our panel. [applause] >> up next booktv takes you to the fourth annual boston book festival for a panel called the future of reading. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon. my name is amy ryan, president of the boston public library and is an honor and pleasure to welcome you to the boston public library for the boston book festival. i would like to thank all the staff, particularly the abrupt porter, founder of the boston book festival for this amazing lineup this weekend of content rich programs. [applause] >> you can imagine my intense interest in this program, the future of reading and all of us in the library world are. i look forward to hearing your comments and what i would like to do is introduce the moderator, said campbell. [applause] >> it is my pleasure to be here today and i would like to start by thanking debbie and her team for putting on a great event. it is wonderful to spend the day here. very exciting for me to be on this particular panel because it cuts to the heart of what this event is all about, reading. and what the future of reading
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 6:00pm EDT
dukakis because a lot of my family still lives there, and i'm from there. i lost boston in 1977 when i left u.p.a. and "the new york times" and moved to washington for "time" magazine. >> where did you go to school? >> i went to college in maine, and finished up at brandice university. >> when did you first get interested in photography? >> very, very young. i was maybe 10 years old, 11 years old. my stepsister was roberta who was a journalist at the "proof dins journal" and a gentleman named win parks was working there. i forgot the other gentleman's name. but there were two photographers there, and i had some interest in cameras. she brought one of them home, and they taught me a little bit about cameras. i set up a little dark room. i was maybe 11 or 12 when that happened. and then i dropped it, as kids do, for like 10 or 12 years, and then i worked on the high school year book. i was interested for four or five months, and then didn't touch the camera for 10 years, eight years. >> what got you back to it? >> it was interesting. when i finally went back to school, i went to brandice
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 3:00pm EST
% american. his anger growing up was the catholic church. being irish catholic in boston, he needed an anchor. he was born in east boston is a kind of local royalty. everybody knew his mother's family and his father's family. his father was a prominent politician and very well respected, very well admired. a very successful businessman. joseph kennedy went to boston. he was a star. he met with the prettiest girl in boston who also happen to be the mayor's daughter. she would later marry. there is a story of the baseball team, he was class president when he went to harvard, and again, he felt part of the community. half of his class when with him to harvard and it was only when he graduated in 1912 that he understood, for the first time and not for the last what it meant to be the irish catholic son of an east boston politician. he wanted to go into banking and finance. he didn't do the job. he didn't get a job offer. he didn't get an interview. all of his friends and classmates, some of who were not as good with numbers as he was, none of who were as articulate or charming or handsome as he w
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
. and the strange way of her family, she was sent to a fancy finishing school in boston. were she was taught to dance well and to become a witty conversationalist and a striking young woman. in 1864, she had her debut in new york. and she came back here a few years later. nothing could outdo the flurry of excitement when she returned to new york in the fall of 1860. the city shimmered with news that the prince of wales was coming to visit. in his honor, a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society than was very excited. excited couples who had paid $10 apiece arrive at the academy of music. women curl their hair and they had special nods to acquaintances and friends. precisely at 10:00 p.m., they prayed and sang god save the queen and the slight friends stepped into the room. for two hours, nearly 3000 of new york's finest citizens rushed like schoolgirls to meet him. in a mad crush, the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously. the guests rushed to follow and they piled their plates with lobster salad, and filled their glasses with champagne. at 2:00 a.m., the dance f
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 7:00am EST
, that day in boston it was raining and about 51, 52 degrees. and so i was fine as long as i was running but then when i stopped running, my body temperature plunged. and francis just casually treated this event but i think she may have, i don't know if she saved my life but she certainly wrapped me up in lots of blankets and supplied with all kinds of drinks, perhaps good ones as well as bad ones, but whatever you did work. because we're both standing here today. >> if you took a snapshot of the world in the year, let's say 1700, you would see a world in which power was broadly diffused around the world. here in north america there really wasn't much economic or military capabilities, but across the atlantic and across the pacific there was a great deal, and power was roughly equally distributed across five men and real centers of power. the holy roman empire, in europe, the ottoman empire in what is today turkey, the mogul empire, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultu
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 12:00am EST
defeated. >> thank you for that. >> we had detailed history of the revolution, the boston tea party and so on and when the american civil war, we knew almost everything about that, the battle of antietam and gettysburg and so one. and when i came here, in 1957, i knew a lot more about the revolution in the civil war than the colleagues here, students and academics. but we never heard a word about the war of 1812. it was not mentioned and it was not in the history. any idea why that could be? >> there was quite a comprehensive education on the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing whatsoever on on the war of 1812 and why might that be? well the british i think did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 is it particularly -- effect at all. for the british this was just one small kind of sideshow in the midst of a global war. so for them, the war of 1812 as important as the one happening on the european continent and around the globe, not the one that is happening in north america. that might have something to do with what was taught in australia. .. the briti
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 9:15am EST
schedule of live coverage of visit our web site at booktv.org. also this weekend is the 36 annual boston international book fair. the fair will feature dozens of exhibitors and display several firsts or special editions of classic novels and books. florida will host the 30 first annual key west literary seminar from january 10th through the 20th. readers can ventured to the festival to sit in on seminars or listen to several lawyers panels. discuss the foundations of writing and creativity. then in february, georgia will host the savannah book festival from the fourteenth to the seventeenth. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area and we will add them to the list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> this is a booktv live coverage of the 29th annual book fair, a full weekend of mar their panels, call ins and other events. here is the lineup for today. in just a minute dave barry, humor columnist will talk about his book lunatics. >> join be joined by will tracy of the onion, the onion book of no knowledge is their lates
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 10:15pm EST
in colonial boston, you can imagine what that might have been like. when i was writing about franklinite realize a large part of the story was going to consist of franklin growing old because he became america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. i started writing about franklin when i was around 40 and i really wondered whether i was going to be able to understand what it was like to grow old and infirm which was a large part of a franklin story. partly for this reason, i decided, and this is carried through in my other book, i decided to tell my stories, i try to relate the lives of my characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who knew them. my books tend to have more eyewitness stuff than some others. if i have a choice between writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody who was mayor, i will tend toward the person who was there. that conveys a certain authenticity and it relieves me of the burden really of sort of providing the authority because the question anyone should have is how d
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:00pm EST
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 6:30am EST
levinson is not just faculty member at harvard graduate school, she is a graduate of boston high school in austin, texas. [applause] i will let her speak about no citizen left behind. >> thank you. i want to pick up on the dilemma you posed at the beginning with how to interpret texas's naep scores. the question of looking at the aggregate where texas is mediocre, dad middle or should we look at the subgroups where texas is outperforming 80% of the other states in the country for every subgroup and what i want to argue is what i talk about in the book is we are obsessed in the nation with a question academically, this picks up a lot of part-time as it takes up a lot of your work when working on public education, thinking is this a good or bad? how do we improve hispanic and african-american students and we put in that versus others and like paul we need to be thinking about much more than academic achievement especially but not only as measured by things like standardized tests and even pretty good ones. that is because not only our kids doing much more than merely succeeding in school
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 10:30am EST
relatives near boston was fine, vermont could not understand why they were calling. later that night when uncle louie finally got through, they gain some sense of the damage. he had had to leave his house and fight his way to the telephone office to get a line. all along main st. big old elms had fallen. the pine forest and paradise was wrecked and that was an area kind of unspoiled trees behind the house in windsor. it's now a beautiful park but it no longer has these immense pines that were there in the 30s. the pine forest and paradise was wrecked. the woods lamotte would say later look as if the giants have been playing jack straus. everywhere lewis said. ice was never the same. it would be nearly two years more before all hell broke loose around the globe. so, this is a digression. now we have to go back to egypt in 1942, but what was interesting anyway was what was about to happen to rob at this point as all hell was about to break loose for him. he would be moved to the front lines. he learned how to operate a wonderful, he thought it was a wonderful enormous gun called a six foun
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 3:00pm EDT
benjamin franklin is toddling around boston.ve you can imagine what that might've been like. when i was writing about franklin, i realized that a large part of the story was s consisto consist of franklin growing old. because he becamet america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. and i started writing about franklin when i was around 40i years old orbo so. i really wondered whether i wase going to be able to understando franklt was like to grow old. partly for this reason, i decided, and this has carried through in my other vote, i decideo te tell my story. i tried to relate the lives of mys, characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who saw them. people who knewperc them. kw my books tend to have more of eyewitness type stuff and some. if i others.ave if i have a choice between in mw writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody there, whole i willn tend to go towards the person who is was there. i think that conveys a certain authenticity. i will say that it relieves the burden of p
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 1:00am EDT
, prince william county in virginia, sb1070 before sb1070. i've been traveling to 32 cities, and boston, liberal, massachusetts, a man stood up and said, hey, you know, we denied in-state tuition to dreamers and deferred action kids as a complete response that, in fact, they have a similar spasm. we saw last night the wonderful governor jerry brown broke hearts because he refused to -- vetoed a bill considered the anti-sb1070 saying the bill said we will not cooperate with secure communities working with deporting people apprehended, and jerry vetoed that, and we that, what? what is going on? you're right. part of my presentation is the beginning is to show how the media, both fox news, but also the liberal media, likes to demonize and single out arizona as a laughing stock because it's an easy target, and we have this well of character, and, i'm, it's one after another of the worst person of the week, always from arizona. well, you know, we don't need uranium regulation. we've been october earth for 6,000 years, and dinosaurs didn't have a problem. we have great gun laws. i'll point it
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 2:30pm EST
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 10:30am EST
, but springfield was a city where people who couldn't get a job in boston, couldn't get a job in new york would come to springfield, a city of about 170,000. and everybody was either irish, italian or they were french- canadian. and it was important to them to know where you came from. i said, well, i came from senegal valley. what? [laughter] but that was an education, just being in springfield. and this country is, it's about the, it is the great meeting place of people from all over the world. and somehow they get here, and they're free. it's -- and once, well, it's a fantastic accomplishment. i started to say america's a wonderful country, but it's -- [inaudible] >> there are some, of course, they probably don't know what they're talking about, but there are some that criticize some of your books that some of the characters are one-dimensional or simplistic or play to stereotypes. >> i think that with pride. so would dickens. [laughter] try to find some complicateed side of the great lawyer in -- [inaudible] i'll send you a postcard, the name are come to me. the name will come to me. i brus
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 12:00pm EST
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 6:00am EST
, boston tea party and so on. and then of the american civil war. we knew almost everything about that. we had the battle of antitee tunnel and gettysburg and so on. into when i came here in 1957, i found i really knew a lot more about the revolution and the civil war than colleagues here, students and academics. but we never heard a word about the war of 1812. it was not mentioned, and it was not in our history. any idea why that should be? >> the speaker noted that he was educated in australia, and there was quite a comprehensive education on the topics of the american revolution and the american civil war but almost nothing on the war of 1812, and why might that be? well, the british did not tend to regard the american war of 1812 as a particular significant war at all. for the british, this was just a side show in the global war with napoleon. so for them the war of 1812 is not as important as the one that's happening on the european continent, so that might have something to do with what was taught in australia. but the fact of the matter is, it doesn't taught very much here either. i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)